Thursday, January 19, 2017

Introduction: Rachel Blume, Student Assistant


Hello fellow readers! My name is Rachel Blume and I am an Archives Student Assistant here at the OHSU Library. Since I’ll be posting now and again (look for me soon!), I wanted to share a little about myself and my experience to give you all some authorial background.

As a Masters of Library & Information Science student at the University of Washington, I have bounced around a lot over the past two and a half years. At various local institutions such as Portland State and Lewis & Clark College, I completed internships in archival processing and library instruction. While I began my current position at OHSU in November (2016), this is not my first post within the OHSU libraries’ Curatorial Services. Last year I worked on the LSTA grant project as a Digital Projects Student Assistant, spending most of my time digitizing public health records. In addition to all this, I am also starting my culminating capstone project, “Preserving the Institutional History of the Oregon Museum of Science & Industry” at OMSI this week.

Before pursuing the Library & Archives profession, I was an undergraduate at Marylhurst University where I received my BA degree in English Literature & Digital Humanities. There I spent much of my time doing literary analysis using digital tools and participating in open access publishing. When I am not working, I enjoy spending time with my family, especially my son (6) and my daughter (4). We enjoy hiking, camping, and anything to do with the beach!

As a Student Assistant here in the archives, I look forward to soaking up all I can before graduating in the Spring through both my duties and the mentorship of my coworkers.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Catherine McNeur, “Controversies over Public Health, Local Food, and Urban Animals in 1850s Manhattan”

Please join us Thursday, January 26, for our first History of Medicine lecture of 2017:



“Controversies over Public Health, Local Food, and Urban Animals in 1850s Manhattan”
Catherine McNeur, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Environmental and Public History, Portland State University

Thursday, January 26, 2017
12pm-1pm
Light refreshments served at noon

Local food has not always been prized as better food.  Using two controversies over local pork and milk in antebellum New York City, McNeur will seek to explain why pigs and cows were treated so differently, why politicians rallied around one but not the other, and how this affected public health, real estate interests, immigrants, consumers, and the developing illustrated newspaper industry.

Catherine McNeur (Ph.D., Yale University) is Assistant Professor of Environmental and Public History at Portland State University. She is also the award-winning author of Taming Manhattan: Environmental Battles in the Antebellum City (Harvard University Press, 2014).